Winter Harbor Veterinary Hospital in Wolfeboro, NH loves the great outdoors!
Winter Harbor Veterinary Hospital in Wolfeboro, NH takes great care of us!
Another Happy Pet Client of Winter Harbor Veterinary Hospital in Wolfeboro, NH
For the Best in Small Animal Care, we go to Winter Harbor Veterinary Hospital in Wolfeboro, NH!

(603) 569-3777
fax (603) 569-3360

Our Location and Hours

667 North Main Street
(NH Route 109)
Wolfeboro, NH  03894
Monday:
8am - 6pm
 
Tuesday:
8am - 6pm
 
Wednesday:
8am - 6pm
 
Thursday:
8am - 6pm
 
Friday:
8am - 6pm
 
Saturday:
Closed
 
Sunday:
Closed
 

Why Diagnostic Tests Are Important

Although we can learn a lot by performing a physical exam on your pet, there are some signs of disease that can only be detected with further testing.  This applies to seemingly healthy pets, also.  Here is a breakdown of critical diagnostic tests we may recommend to ensure your pet is as healthy on the insideas he/she appears to be on the outside.

1)Fecal exam:  We recommend checking your pet's stool twice a year for signs of intestinal disease and parasites.  We will examine the stool for outward signs of disease - such as blood, mucus or abnormal consistency.  We will also perform a fecal flotation procedure and look under the microscope for common internal parasites.

2)Heartworm/Lyme tests:  Each year we collect a small sample of your pet's blood to test for heartworms and tick borne diseases.  Even pets that stay indoors are susceptible, as mosquitoes and ticks can slip into homes and bite an unprotected pet.  Even if your pet is on heartworm prevention year-round, it is critical to do this blood test annually, as even one missed or late dose of preventive can put them at risk.

3)Complete blood count (CBC) and serum chemistry profile:  Symptoms of some conditions or diseases won't show up until your pet is very sick.  As your pet ages, we recommend these tests to check their overall body functions.

4)Urinalysis: Like a blood test, a urine test gives us an understanding of how healthy your pet is on the inside.  It offers clues that point to underlying causes of disease, such as bladder infection or kidney disease.